Year-End Roundup: Our Top 5 Posts for Higher Ed Instructors in 2019

Teaching Trends
Teaching Trends
Reading Time: 2 minutes

This has been a big year for content at Cengage. We relaunched Today’s Learner just last summer and are happy to share that we’ve been able to push out regular, relevant content each week for our higher education audience.

As we look ahead to 2020, we’re reflecting on our “greatest hits” of 2019. Take a look at our most popular posts from this past year:

Developing a Personal Brand in and Out of the Classroom

Personal brand is a big buzzword used across industries. And while at first blush, the concept may not seem applicable to higher education, our deep dive post explains how and why personal brand matters, and what instructors can do to both improve their brands and help their students create their own.

 Cramming Works as a Learning Strategy (and What You Should Do About It)

An insightful guest contribution from Dr. Stephen Chew proposed a counterintuitive idea—what if cramming actually works as a learning strategy? Chew’s unique and thoughtful take includes practical tools for instructors to help students make the most of study time.

Everybody Wants Critical Thinking—But What Is It?

Critical thinking is one of the most commonly requested skills by employers. Trouble is, no one can seem to agree on what it actually is. Our infographic highlights recent research into the demand for critical thinking skills in the workplace, as well as the disconnect it creates between employers and students.

I’m A Recent Grad: Here’s What I Wish I Had Known as a Student

This post contributed by Brandon Medina reflecting on life after college was extremely popular and it’s easy to understand why—his perspective included some very relatable issues. From his struggle to find the right job to accepting that it’s okay not to know everything, Brandon’s story crystallized the post-grad experience.

Beyond Tradition: Understanding the Students in Your Classroom Today

Finally, our most popular post of the year sought to dismiss a common myth—the existence of the “traditional” college student. Gone are the days where all college students fit the assumed 18- to 22-year-old college demographic. The post explores who today’s students really are and offers strategies for instructors looking to help them succeed.

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